Classes Offered

THE 2020-21 YEAR

Please message me directly if you are interested in any classes for next steps

TUESDAY

World History from the African Perspective

12-1:30 PM

Most world history classes do not consider the tremendous role African nations played.  This course offers an examination of world history from the prehistoric to present, using Africa as a focal point.  The fall semester focuses on Africa through the Medieval, with special attention placed on Egypt, Libya, Numidia, Aksum, Zimbabwe, the West African States, the Islamic caliphates, and Ife.  Winter session focuses on European exploitation and colonialism, with spring session focusing on post colonialism and independence movements, as well as current events.

13 sessions, beginning September 15 (November 24 off)

Winter session begins January 12

Art and Society

2-3:30 PM

What role does art play in history, politics, religion, sociology, psychology, media, urban studies, race, gender, and ethnicity?  This is a seminar-style class that explains some of the basics of art history, while applying art to a broader context.  Themes for fall include power, portraiture, stereotyping, broad historical themes, and psychology.  We will focus on key artworks in a global context, from prehistory to modern.  Students work collaboratively with designing the syllabus.

13 sessions, beginning September 15 (November 24 off)

Winter session begins January 12

Holocaust and Human Behavior

4-5:30 PM

This course is modeled on the Facing History and Ourselves curriculum, which analyzes the roots of bigotry and racism to increase awareness and involvement in social action.   The fall semester focuses on the roots of the Holocaust, from early anti-Semitism, pogroms, imperialism, genocides, and the rise of the Third Reich.  Winter session focuses on the Third Reich, WWII, and the experience of the Holocaust.  The Spring semester focuses on the stories of survivors, Holocaust remembrance, and the rise of anti- Semitism.

13 sessions, beginning September 15 (November 24 off)

Winter Session begins January 12

WEDNESDAYS

 Literature of the Early Modern World

10-11 AM

This literature course accompanies the Ages of Revolutions class listed below (students can sign up separately) and focuses on key works from the periods studied.  We begin with Thomas More’s Utopia and then move to John Milton’s Paradise Lost.  Students will help design the reading list, with works such as Candide, poetry of William Shakespeare, Phillis Wheatley, Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities, and more.

13 sessions, beginning September 15 (November 24 off)

Winter Session begins January 13

Ages of Revolutions

11-12:30 PM

We begin with colonialism and its effects on the non-European world, with emphasis on Africa and the Americas, and move on to study the cataclysmic wars of the 17th and early 18th century. The idea of absolutism, the overthrow of absolute monarchies, and slave rebellions around the world (ending with the Haitian Rebellion) will be discussed. We’ll look at this age of globalism from many perspectives: the rulers, their subjects, women, slaves, pirates and privateers, Native Americans, and revolutionaries.  Winter Session will focus on Napoleon, the Revolutions of 1848, and Russia. Spring Session will focus on later 20th century revolutions such as the Cultural Revolution and the Iranian Revolution.  FULL

13 sessions, beginning September 16 (November 25 off)

Winter Session begins January 13

THURSDAYS

Justice and Injustice

5-6:30 PM

How do societies attempt to administer justice?  In this class, we study some of the key civil and criminal cases in world history, and focus on how they shaped history and society.   For the fall semester, cases include the trial of Socrates, the trial of Thomas More, witchcraft trials, the Zenger trial, and others.  We also consider the role of the judicial branch in government, with focus on the United States and the Supreme Court decisions under Justices Marshall and Taney.  Winter session continues with cases such as Plessey v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board, the Scopes trial,  “Mississippi Burning”, Roe v. Wade, Ruby Ridge, and OJ. We devote spring term to more recent trials, such as Citizens United, Obergefell v. Hodges, BLM based cases, and challenges to homeschooling laws.

13 sessions, beginning September 17 (November 26 off)

Winter Session begins January 14

FRIDAYS

 History and Science Interconnections

10:30-12 PM

The course is a “SHTEAM” instead of just STEM or STEAM. Topics include forensics (from ancient Egyptian and Peruvian mummies to bog bodies, and more), DNA (what can DNA tell us about genetics, migration, adaptability, and evolution), climate change (how can we determine climate change over time and is there ancient evidence for climate change), technology (early attempts at artificial intelligence, inventions, etc), epidemiology (what can we learn about diseases in the ancient, medieval, and the early modern world through modern methodology), botany (plant evolution, GMOs, mind alternating substances and their uses), astronomy (ancient understanding of the sky), physics (before and after Aristotle’s four elements), and medicine (surgeries, cures and more).

13 sessions, beginning September 11 (September 18 and November 27 off)

Winter Session begins January 8

APUSH Style United States History

12:30 PM- 2:30 PM

This American History class is for 15 and up, or otherwise mature students ready for a challenge (and homework!).  US History is a college prep, honors level course that satisfies the requirements for the AP US History exam, but also offers opportunities for research papers on student-directed topics.   We work on primary source documents, historiography, art and artifacts, and also engage in history-based games for stronger recall.  Topics for fall include American prehistory to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution. Strong focus on African American and Native American perspectives.

13 sessions, beginning September 11 (September 18 and November 27 off)

Winter Session begins January 8

Literature of the Early Modern World  

4:30-5:30 PM

This literature course accompanies the Ages of Revolutions class listed below (students can sign up separately) and focuses on key works from the periods studied.  We begin with Thomas More’s Utopia and then move to John Milton’s Paradise Lost.  Students will help design the reading list, with works such as Candide, poetry of William Shakespeare, Phillis Wheatley, Charles Dickens’ Tale of Two Cities, and more.

13 sessions, beginning September 11 (September 18 and November 21off)

Winter Session begins January 8

Ages of Revolution

5:30-7 PM

We begin with colonialism and its effects on the non-European world, with emphasis on Africa and the Americas, and move on to study the cataclysmic wars of the 17th and early 18th century. The idea of absolutism, the overthrow of absolute monarchies, and slave rebellions around the world (ending with the Haitian Rebellion) will be discussed. We’ll look at this age of globalism from many perspectives: the rulers, their subjects, women, slaves, pirates and privateers, Native Americans, and revolutionaries.  Winter Session will focus on Napoleon, the Revolutions of 1848, and Russia. Spring Session will focus on later 20th century revolutions such as the Cultural Revolution and the Iranian Revolution.

13 sessions, beginning September 11 (September 18 and November 27 off)

Winter Session begins January 8

OPEN TO ARRANGEMENTS

 Senior and Gap Year Capstone

 For seniors and gap year students, this is an opportunity to meet up with other seniors and homeschool educators to work on your final projects.  This is a student driven opportunity.  Dates and times tbd.

Some General Information

  • Ages for all classes: High School, with mature middle schoolers accepted.  If there is interested in sessions for younger students, please let me know
  • For Winter 2020, all classes will meet via ZOOM synchronously.
  • Homework is always presented, but not mandatory (with the exception of AP style classes, which require a lot of preparation). Each family may set the work expectations.  For the literature classes, I expect students to have the book that we’re reading.
  • Students are expected to be courteous to each other, and to me. This means engaging in meaningful discussions relating to the material, not using class time for personal means, staying off phones, and acting in a respectful manner to me and to classmates, which includes students’ names and pronouns.
  • Please feel free to reach out concerning your child’s progress and participation in classes